International Conference

Work in a Warming World:
Labour, Climate Change, and Social Struggle

November 29 – December 1, 2013
Toronto, Ontario Canada

The Work in a Warming World Community-University Research Alliance (W3) is organising a major international panel on the role of labour and work in the struggle to slow global warming.

Based in Toronto, Canada, the W3 conference is for labour and environmental activists, students, academic researchers, policy makers and the concerned public.

W3’s conference goals are to:  

  • bring together labour and environmental activists from the global north and the global south;
  • make path-breaking labour and environmental research on the climate struggle known to a wider public
  • create a platform for ongoing links between researchers and unions to develop ideas, strategies and tactics;
  • share best practices in greening work and workplaces;
  • bring labour and labour research to the forefront of greening the world of work;
  • identify opportunities for labour leadership in the struggle to slow global warming.

Global warming is a universal concern, perhaps the greatest challenge facing work, workers and the planet in the 21st century. Climate change is already changing how we work, what we produce, and where we produce it. It shifts employment within and between countries, regions and communities, creating millions of climate migrants in the global north and the global south, dislocating people and industries and futures. But as global warming ravages jobs, work itself produces significant greenhouse gases (GHGs). And as important as work is to slowing global warming, the role of work and workers has been strangely absent from policy and social science research. Labour and environmental movements have yet to effectively address the role of climate change in the world of work.

What role can workers and their unions play in slowing global warming?

Further information on the W3 2013 International Conference:
www.workinawarmingworld.yorku.ca/w3conference/

Contact: Ann Kim – ann_kim@yorku.ca

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